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Schedule

Monday 14th November - MiniConfs Day 1
12:30 pm
12:30 pm
Mon
Break for Lunch
Tuesday 15th November - MiniConfs Day 2
12:30 pm
12:30 pm
Tue
Break for Lunch
Wednesday 16th November - Day 1
Main Room
Room Two
Room Three
9:00 am
9:00 am
Wed
Registration
10:30 am
10:30 am
Wed
Break for Refreshments
12:30 pm
12:30 pm
Wed
1:00 pm
1:00 pm
Break for Lunch
3:00 pm
3:00 pm
Wed
Break for Refreshments
6:00 pm
6:00 pm
Wed
onwards
onwards
Conference Dinner
Old Parliament House
Featuring:
Dinner Keynote: Jon Oxer
Freedom for Atoms!
Thursday 17th November - Day 2
Main Room
Room Two
Room Three
9:00 am
9:00 am
Thu
9:30 am
9:30 am
Keynote: Damian Conway
Fun with Dead Languages
10:00 am
10:00 am
Thu
Break for Refreshments
12:30 pm
12:30 pm
Thu
1:00 pm
1:00 pm
Break for Lunch
3:00 pm
3:00 pm
Thu
Break for Refreshments
3:30 pm
3:30 pm
Thu
Discussion Panel
4:00 pm
4:00 pm
Thu
4:30 pm
4:30 pm
5:00 pm
5:00 pm
Lightning Talks
6:00 pm
6:00 pm
Thu
onwards
onwards
Drinks
Venue TBA
Friday 18th November - Day 3
Main Room
Room Two
Room Three
10:00 am
10:00 am
Fri
Break for Refreshments
12:30 pm
12:30 pm
Fri
1:00 pm
1:00 pm
Break for Lunch
3:00 pm
3:00 pm
Fri
Break for Refreshments
3:30 pm
3:30 pm
Fri
4:00 pm
4:00 pm
Lightning Talks
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OSIA MiniConf
9:00am Mon Room 2, Manning Clark Center

The Open Source Industry Australia MiniConf will aim to raise awareness of successful business models for FOSS, demonstrate through case studies the commercial viability of FOSS and reiterate the benefits to businesses of deploying FOSS.

The OSIA MiniConf will aslo summarise the current FOSS acquisition policies of Commonwealth and State governments.

The event will be of primary interest to developers and business people seeking to market FOSS solutions to industry and government, but will also be of interest to entities considering deployment of FOSS solutions in their enterprises.

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PHP MiniConf
9:00am Mon Room 3, Manning Clark Center

With the success of last years Pre-PHP day at OSDC 2010, OSDC 2011 presents a mini-conf covering all topics related to PHP. The topics presented include PHP frameworks, CMS and straight PHP talks.

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Break for Lunch
12:30pm Mon Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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GeoTools Workshop
1:30pm Mon Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Are you new to GeoSpatial? Does scientific mumbo-jumbo make your head hurt? Are you (gasp!) just out to get the job done? Come to this workshop and go home happy.

The GeoTools “Geospatial for Java” workshop has been featured at conferences internationally offering a visual introduction to mapping for Java developers. We will exploring how you can integrate GIS services into your next project. For those new to the GeoSpatial scene we provide an introduction to current concepts and projects, and how to avoid common pitfalls.

We start off with something nice, fun and visual – displaying local files using the development environment of your choice. Covering both the concepts and the science of map making the workbooks serve as an excellent reference, but the focus is always on you and the code you need to get the job done.

We explore the concept of a Feature (literally something you can draw on a map), Geometry (what to actually draw) and details like coordinate reference systems, units and projections. The good news is all this stuff is captured at the Java level as nice normal objects by the GeoTools and JTS Topology Suite projects. There are utility classes around so we can avoid going down into crazy scientific detail.

The workshop offers a steady series of take home workbooks introducing:

  • Feature creation
  • Geometry, Coordinate Reference Systems and Re-projection
  • Spatial Queries
  • Handling large format rasters
  • Working with Style

We will work with a couple of common GeoSpatial data formats, the use of PostGIS, Web Map Servers (such as GeoServer and MapServer) and Web Feature Servers.

Attend this workshop and receive one million randomly generated points free of charge. Just show up – it will be fun.

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OSIA MiniConf Continued
1:30pm Mon Room 2, Manning Clark Center
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GR8 MiniConf
9:00am Tue Room 1, Manning Clark Center

The GR8 Conference is a conference dedicated to the Groovy dynamic language, the Grails web framework, the Gradle build framework, the Griffon Swing framework, and other great technologies — hence the pun and code name GR8.

The conference normally runs as a 2 day conference twice a year in Europe and the US (see http://gr8conf.org) and despite plans for a down-under leg, has yet to make it to Australia. We are trialing the conference here as a 1 day event as part of OSDC and if successful, the full conference will be here next year!

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Agile Workshop
9:00am Tue Room 2, Manning Clark Center

This workshop covers the basic concepts of Agile management and how these methodologies can be used within your organisation to improve development processes and reduce ongoing development costs. Agile can improve software quality through an iterative development approach. This course aims to provide the tools for software managers and teams to improve customer satisfaction through the rapid and continuous delivery of useful software. We also look at how to use the best of traditional (or waterfall) processes within Agile techniques.

Participant Benefits:

  • Gain a clear understanding of agile management methodologies, and how these can improve business processes.
  • Learn how to optimise development times, improve client satisfaction and reduce development cost.
  • Learn how to improve software estimation the Agile way
  • Participate in workshops to improve progress tracking and reporting
  • Discover how to attract and retain good software developers

Outline:

  • History of Agile Development and the Agile Manifesto
  • Project Planning with Scrum
  • Test Driven Development
  • Extreme Programming (XP)
  • Feature Driven Development
  • Combining methodologies to create the best system for your business
  • Tracking and Reporting
  • Agile Team Dynamics
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Arduino Workshop*
9:00am Tue Room 3, Manning Clark Center

University of Sydney Lecturer Justin Clayden, and Little Bird’s Marcus Schappi will be our workshop trainers.

All participants get to design and build their own Arduino project.

What and why? Arduino boards are small physical computing platforms, consisting of a simple I/O board and an integrated development environment. Arduino’s can be used to develop stand-alone interactive objects or can be connected to software on your computer.

In this workshop we will have a look at the Arduino Uno, and also look at programming possibilities within Arduino.

More information about Arduino can be found on the Arduino website

Trajectory: In this one day intensive workshop you’ll learn the lay-out of the Arduino board, you’ll learn how to connect other hardware to it, and you’ll learn the basic programming skills needed for building your own Arduino application. All participants design and start their own Arduino project.

Materials: We will supply all materials required for the Workshop, but feel free to bring
parts from your own projects which you need help with.

Trainer: Justin Clayden and Marcus Schappi.

Target Group: Art students, Computer scientists, hardware hackers, fabric experts, product developers, nerds, dancers – everyone is welcome.

Requirements:

  • Some technical affinity is required. Some experience in programming and electronics will is useful, but is not strictly necessary.
  • Your own Laptop Running Windows XP – Windows 7, Mac OS X 10.3-7, or Linux will be required. (It is assumed that you have Arduino setup on your laptop prior to starting the workshop).
*Additional Arduino MiniConf ticket required. See http://littlebirdelectronics.com/products/osdc-2011-arduino-workshop for details.
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Metrics Workshop
9:00am Tue Room 4, Manning Clark Center

In this workshop the Mozilla Metrics team will share their experiences using Bigdata, NoSQL and other Open Source Business Intelligence tools to improve Firefox:

Mozilla’s flagship product is Firefox, delivered as both a desktop and a mobile product (on Android). The metrics team has the responsibility to provide data access systems, reporting, visualization, and analysis for all the teams in Mozilla to be able to make effective and informed decisions.

One of the latest requirements came from the Platform team, where we were asked to collect and analyze telemetry data submitted from users of the nightly and aurora builds of Firefox.

In order to make Firefox better (with all that implies in terms of speed, memory management, etc) we need data. Mozilla has traditionally relied on benchmarks to optimize Firefox. Unfortunately benchmarks do not completely correspond to actual user usage.

Beginning with version 6, Firefox has telemetry infrastructure and users will be asked to opt-in to sending anonymous performance statistics, user interface feature usage, memory usage, and responsiveness to Mozilla

Metrics has the task to collect and analyze that data. The workflow is described here:

  1. Usage statistics are collected from session usage
  2. That data is sent to Mozilla servers and through a REST interface, and using the Bagheera project the data is stored in Hazelcast, a distributed in-memory datagrid
  3. Using a custom implementation of a MapStore, the data is stored from Hazelcast to HBASE which is built on top of the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS). In the future Telemetry can use Bagheera’s (as of version 0.3) MultiMapStore to store in HBase and index in ElasticSearch simultaneously.
  4. The documents are then indexed in an ElasticSearch cluster, an Open Source (Apache 2), distributed, RESTful, search engine built on top of Lucene
  5. The data is then ready to be aggregated and analyzed by user request in an interface built for that purpose. For that we use Pentaho Open Source Business Intelligence
  6. We focus a lot on the interface layer of the BI system, and the dashboards are built using the Ctools, a collection of plugins to the Pentaho system that allows building very customized and effective user interfaces and versatile data connections.
  7. Using CDA and kettle the user requests are sent to ElasticSearch and the data is aggregated and returned to the user to be analyzed.

All this large-scale process is done using open-source technologies.

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Break for Lunch
12:30pm Tue Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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GR8 MiniConf Continued
1:30pm Tue Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Go Workshop
1:30pm Tue Room 2, Manning Clark Center

“Less talk, more code,” is the philosophy of this hands-on introduction to the Go Programming Language. We’ll begin with the basics and then move on to Go’s novel type system and concurrency primitives. You will learn by completing small coding exercises of increasing complexity. It’s a lot of fun.

So, if you’ve wanted to get your hands dirty with Go but haven’t had a good excuse, come along!

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Arduino Workshop Continued
1:30pm Tue Room 3, Manning Clark Center
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Upstarta Workshop*
1:30pm Tue Room 4, Manning Clark Center

First up Arjen will introduce you to the basics of the Upstarta philosophy, so we’re all on the same wavelength. Then we’ll introduce a number of practical tools to assess disruptive viability of an idea (product or service), work out best marketing positioning to not be hindered by competition, and other applications of the Upstarta principles. We’ll see why various known products succeeded or failed, and discuss (case studies).

In the second part of the workshop, we’ll put your new skills to use on both known concepts as well as any new ideas the participants bring along. Please bring ideas in abundance, and write them down beforehand so that you can tell what it’s about within 10-20 seconds. We’ll specifically filter for disruptive ideas (or tweak an idea to make it disruptive) as it enables cheap market entry, pick a few, and work on them in smaller groups. We then recombine to discuss what each group has come up with!

Exchanging ideas and insights, and asking questions, even with people some might consider to be direct competitors, is more valuable than risky. If your idea is dependent on secrecy, it’s probably not that viable. Arjen will also do an Upstarta-related talk in the OSIA miniconf Monday afternoon.

Upstarta was started in 2009 by Arjen Lentz, and focuses on people who run – or are interested in starting – their business according to a set of Principles that make them more people friendly (both to clients and self), resilient to recessions, (potentially) better for the environment, and more.

*Additional Upstarta Workshop ticket required. See http://http://upstarta.biz/ for details.
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Registration
9:00am Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Keynote: Senator Kate Lundy
9:30am Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Openness in Government: from data to crowdsourcing: Senator Kate Lundy will discuss the Open Government agenda, and how open data, open standards and open technologies underpin the capacity for government to be transparent, participatory and engaged with the citizens it serves. Senator Lundy will also discuss some of the hurdles and opportunities for open government in Australia.

Senator Kate Lundy was first elected to the Senate for the Australian Capital Territory in 1996. Following the 2010 Federal Election, she was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister and Parliamentary Secretary for Immigration and Citizenship.

Senator Lundy has participated in every Senate Inquiry relating to telecommunications and Information Technology over the last fifteen years, and has spearheaded Gov 2.0 initiatives such as her Public Sphere events which facilitate online public collaboration on policy development.

In September 2009 Senator Lundy was recognised for her leadership in Gov2.0 online innovation with her Public Sphere initiative when she was ranked 13th in a short list of 25 global leaders by the International Centre for E-democracy and Politics Online.

In 2010 Senator Lundy was awarded the most influential person changing the world of Internet and politics, and accepted the award at the World eDemocracy Forum in France.

Senator Lundy continues to be a strong advocate for the use of the Internet, digital technology and ICT innovation to strengthen the Australian economy for future growth, to transform public engagement in government processes and to enhance social inclusion within our communities.

Senator Lundy is also patron for CASE: Computer Assistance Support Education, a non-profit group that provides smart, open technology support to community organisations.

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Break for Refreshments
10:30am Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Practical Online Anonymity with Open Source Software and Open ServicesAlexander Zangerl
11:00am Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Privacy and the preservation thereof has become a very problematic issue with the recent shift towards the Internet as the communication channel and the increased feasibility of collecting and mining vast amounts of personal data.

On one hand calls for privacy-protecting legislation are being heard, on the other hand there is an opposing trend towards stricter identification and governmental control of all communications which we believe is a dangerous development. A healthy society needs the equivalent of an anonymous letter or post card as part of the checks and balances that keep governmental and commercial powers from sliding towards corruption and totalitarian regimes.

Today an ever increasing amount of personal data is mined by all kinds of parties, and and with the inevitable feature creep most information is repurposed and reused way beyond the originally intended purposes. It is thus advisable for everybody to take steps that limit the accumulation of personal data in others’ hands – and this dissemination control requires both technical support as well as a security-conscious mindset. Our goal for this paper is to examine practical mechanisms that are generally available for protecting one’s anonymity online, focusing specifically on open source software and open services.

We decided to concentrate on anonymity rather than the wider-ranging concept of privacy, because protecting the latter post-disclosure relies on the other involved parties not using or leaking your information beyond the terms originally agreed upon.

Looking at the recent history of unauthorized information disclosures leads us to the conclusion that the battle is lost for all practical purposes once your information is in others’ hands, and to prevent your personal data from getting we believe that enforcing full anonymity is the only reliable means of achieving this goal.

Dr Alexander Zangerl is an Austrian who has been living in Australia for most of this decade. Since 1993 he’s been working as a Software Designer and Developer and after finishing his (roughly masters-equivalent) degree in Technical Mathematics (University of Technology, Vienna) in 1996 his focus shifted more to System Administration and R&D in an ISP environment.

Later on he’s worked as a Security Consultant and Network Engineer, and eventually he joined Bond University as Assistant Professor (and system administration specialist for tricky stuff, being an outspoken member of the Unix Guerilla at Bond) in 2001. On the side he completed a PhD degree in 2006/07 which covered the development of a tamper-resistant storage system using peer-to-peer technologies and related trust issues.

In his Copious Free Time he risks his neck flying paragliders and occasionally his sanity contributing to the Debian Project.

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Messaging with Bunnies: RabbitMQSteve Dalton
11:00am Wed Room 2, Manning Clark Center

RabbitMQ is an open source message broker, using the standard Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP). It’s writen in Erlang and is built on the Open Telecom Platform framework.

Since being aquired last year by SpringSource it has gained particular popularity in the Java community due to it’s robustness, APIs and flexibility.

This talk is a basic introduction o AMQP and RabbitMQ and will go through basic setup and the various APIs available to developers in a variety of languages.

Steve Dalton: Steve is co-founder of Refactor, a software development consultancy based out of the Gold Coast, Queensland. His focus is Agile development on the Java Platform, making particular use of the Groovy language to Get Things Done.

He is a familiar face in the South East Queensland tech community, running the local barcamps and several regular meetups. He is a strong advocate of Linux and Free Software and has been actively using Linux for over 15 years.

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An introduction to TitaniumGraham Weldon
11:00am Wed Room 3, Manning Clark Center

Always wanted to develop mobile apps, but never had the time to learn a new language? With tools emerging and available today, you can leverage existing skills with languages like Javascript, common to web developers, to build and deploy mobile applications.

I’ll run through the Titanium SDK, how it works, why it works and what this means for web developers that want to take their skills mobile.

Graham Weldon: Graham is a core developer for CakePHP, and developer advocate for the framework. Contributing to CakePHP for 3 years, and developing applications on PHP for over 10 years. Graham is a world recognised public speaker in the PHP and Open Source Software communities.

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Koha: Bringing libraries into the present dayRobin Sheat
12:00pm Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Koha is Free software for running libraries (that’s the ones with books), from top to bottom. It’s over 10 years old now, and has developers and users spread all over the world.

This talk is going to provide a look at the system, what it can do, where it’s used and how it stacks up against the proprietary alternatives (spoiler: pretty darn well.)

It will also look into how the free software development model works for Koha, the companies and individuals involved in it, and its users.

Robin Sheat is a developer at Catalyst IT in Wellington. His primary project there is working on the Koha library management system. This includes programming, training, migrations, maintaining the Debian packages, and spending time in warm places in Asia-Pacific.

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Open Government: what does it all mean, really?Pia Waugh
12:00pm Wed Room 2, Manning Clark Center

Pia Waugh will present her thoughts on the practicalities of “Open Government”, or “Gov 2.0” and what it means for government services, procurement, technology policy, the ICT industry and the FOSS community. She will discuss a little about how open data, participatory democracy and citizen-centric services translate into implementation along with some practical case studies around Australia and the world. She’ll also briefly touch upon some of the technical consideration including around Web 2.0, geospatial policy,. cloud, augmented reality, open standards and more can play a part.

Please note this presentation is purely Pia’s thoughts and not an official representation of government.

Pia Waugh started work as an Adviser to Senator Kate Lundy in April 2009. Prior to this she was a consultant at Waugh Partners in Sydney, Australia. She has also worked as a Research Coordinator for the Australian Service for Knowledge on Open Source Software (ASK-OSS), the Open Source strategist for a large systems integrator and still works to develop the Australian FOSS industry and improve Government policies towards FOSS. She has been working with Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) such as Linux for about 8 years. She has seen FOSS deliver not only economic benefits to countries and business all around the world, but significant social and environmental benefits to communities everywhere.

Pia co-wrote a paper called “The Foundations of Openness” with the OSS-Watch project at Oxford University. It covers her ideas around openness beyond FOSS, and the impact of closed/open approaches to licensing, knowledge, governance, standards and the market.

Pia is a community leader both in Australia and internationally. She is a founding member of OLPC Friends, a community-based organisation focused on bringing the OLPC vision to Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific. She was at various times also the President of Software Freedom International, the President (then VP) of Linux Australia, and on the linux.conf.au 2007 organising team. She has spoken at Software Livre in Brazil, FOSS events in China, the Open Source World Conferences in Spain, the World Summit of Information Society (United Nations) in Switzerland, linux.conf.au in New Zealand and linux.conf.au, education au, Making Links, various TechGirls events and many more in Australia! She is passionate about improving the world by getting great technologies to people who need them, and creating a well-connected global society where anyone can play and succeed.

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Fake your way as a Mobile Developer Rockstar with PhoneGapGlen Smith
12:00pm Wed Room 3, Manning Clark Center

With the proliferation of mobile devices out there, it’s impossible to stay in touch with everything that’s going on. If you want to target all the major platforms, you need to maintain separate codebases in Objective C, Java, and C# which for most of us is just impractical. In this talk we look at PhoneGap – an open source, crossplatform toolkit for build single-source mobile apps that compile down to each native platform. All you need to get started is some basic html, css and javascript skills, and you can fake your way to the rest.

Glen Smith: Glen is a Canberra-based consultant, developer and author. Co-author of Manning’s “Grails in Action”, co-host on the “Grails Podcast”, maintainer of opencsv, groovyblogs, and several other open source projects.

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Break for Lunch
12:30pm Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Opening a Closed WorldDan Bentley
1:30pm Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Lots of people talk about how to make a successful open source project from scratch. In this talk, I discuss a different problem: how to take a successful closed source project and turn it into a successful open source projects. The challenges are different, and both technical, political, and social.

Dan Bentley is a software engineer at Google New York. He works on: helping Google respectfully use open source code; open-sourcing closed source projects from Google, and http://code.google.com’s Project Hosting. He likes planes, cryptic crosswords, and fun.

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SQL Locking and TransactionsArjen Lentz
1:30pm Wed Room 2, Manning Clark Center

You reckon you know how this stuff works? Well, let’s see!

Arjen describes how locking and transactions operate in concept, and in practice (the two are not the same)

If you bring your laptop along, you can participate in a fun little exercise… using MySQL or any other SQL RDBMS of your choice.

Arjen Lentz: Arjen is founder and Exec.Director of Open Query which delivers remote database maintenance under a subscription model. He helped build MySQL AB (employee#25, 2001-2007) until just before its acquisition by Sun Microsystems. He also co-authored the 2nd edition of O’Reilly’s High Performance MySQL book, and speaks regularly at user groups and conferences.

Originally Arjen is a C programmer, with coding experience going back to the early 80s. He also has a keen interest in Open Source and sustainable business models (Upstarta.biz), and started the BlueHackers.org initiative.

Outside work hours, Arjen likes to spend time with his daughter, cook, walk, camp, read, listen to music, and grow herbs/veggies.

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Design for developers: making beautiful Android appsParis Buttfield-Addison & Chris Neugebauer
1:30pm Wed Room 3, Manning Clark Center

Building amazing user experiences is not an optional component of mobile development. This session, which contains zero coding, will give battle-hardened (optionally bearded) engineers a crash course in user experience (UX) design, with a particular focus on Android app design.

Learn where to start design, how to think about design when you’re building a personal project, and learn the common Android UX paradigms and considerations.

Design is not optional anymore, come and learn why.

Paris Buttfield-Addison is an author, mobile designer and hacker. Co-founder of Hobart-based mobile development studio, Secret Lab, Paris is a smartphone expert. Leading mobile efforts for a variety of clients and companies (from San Francisco to Sweden and beyond), Paris is also the co-author of a number of books, most recently on iPhone game development and Android UX. Paris is currently working with prominent startup Meebo, Inc., creating their mobile strategy and app design.

Paris is the author of best seller “iPhone and iPad Game Development For Dummies” as well as author of upcoming Android UX book.

Christopher Neugebauer is a semi-professional nerd, and recent first-class Honours graduate in Computer Science of the University of Tasmania. Previously an intern at Google in Sydney, he currently works in mobile and web development for Secret Lab, a boutique development studio based in Hobart, Australia for clients throughout the world. Since he likes it when developers share their experiences, he has twice organised application development miniconfs at Linux.conf.au (in 2010 and 2011).

When not coding, Christopher can be found taking long, artificially-lit walks down fake beaches, arguing the benefits of Python to anyone who won’t listen, and watching other people drinking beer. He also enjoys presenting on Open Source development at Mobile development conferences, and presenting on Mobile development at Open Source conferences.

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Free as in KittensEvan Leybourn
2:30pm Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center

While Open Source has been steadily gaining traction across business and government many organisations are still confused by the total cost of ownership (TCO) of open source products. The presentation takes a look at the various cost, procurement and maintenance models, and proposes methods of managing the costs of open source within corporations.

People who were convinced by “Free as in Speech” were the amongst the first to adopt FOSS as a method for improving and developing tools and software unencumbered by over complex and restrictive license conditions. This was followed swiftly by the “Free as in Beer” crowd who were attracted by the free cost of purchase in what could be an extremely expensive market.

However, both of these arguments, while valid, confuse the value proposition of open source software. The concept “Free as in Kittens” is an alternative way of looking at the TCO of open source products based on 3 factors.

There is no (or minimal) initial purchase cost for the product.
There is an ongoing maintenance or upkeep cost for the life of the product.
The extrinsic value of the product is significant and much greater than the ongoing cost (in other words, we all love kittens).

Evan Leybourn is a manager, trainer and public speaker with over 10 years of experience in the fields of Business Intelligence (BI), Information Data Management (IDM) and Agile Project Management. He has held senior managerial and consulting positions in private industry and government and currently works as the Director of Business Intelligence with the Australian Government in Canberra.

Evan runs regular management, business intelligence and agile professional development courses across Australia and South East Asia and speaks at a variety of ICT and management conferences on:

  • ICT Leadership
  • Agile Project Management
  • Business Intelligence & Data Warehousing
  • Agile Business Intelligence
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CCAN: C Code Archive. Like CPAN, Before It Got Popular!Rusty Russell
2:30pm Wed Room 2, Manning Clark Center

The C Code Archive Network (aka CCAN) is a collection of C code snippets with minimal structure to allow them to be useful. The project started several years ago at OSDC with input from Adam Kennedy, and has been slowly maturing ever since.

This talk will cover what’s there, how to get involved, where we chose the same or different routes as CPAN, and what it’s like to deal with greybearded C coders who aren’t used to fancy techniques like “testing”.

Rusty Russell: Rusty is the main coder and founder of the C Code Archive Network (aka. CCAN). He previously worked on the Linux kernel, SAMBA, and various other F/OSS projects.

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Free Software in the Android EcosystemAndrew McMillan
2:30pm Wed Room 3, Manning Clark Center

The Android Ecosystem is generally well-disposed to the idea of free (open source) software, after all it has it’s roots there. Nevertheless as it takes off in it’s distribution to the handsets of hundreds of millions of people worldwide there is a clash of cultures.

In this talk I will present my thoughts about free software and the Android Market, in particular I will try to cover the following topics:

  • free software advocacy
  • earning money
  • building community
  • interfacing with others
  • sharing libraries

Not all of these things are done at all well within the free software community on Android and I want to explore ways that we can do them better.

Andrew McMillan has been in the IT industry for around 30 years, in most positions from programmer to manager. In 1997 he founded Catalyst IT with a bunch of other people and got involved in providing services around free software. In 2008 he left Catalyst to found Morphoss where he develops Android applications under contract, and for his own enjoyment.

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Break for Refreshments
3:00pm Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Open-source tools for field data collection and analysis at Geoscience AustraliaNariman Habili
3:30pm Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Geoscience Australia (GA) conducts post-disaster field surveys to understand the vulnerability of buildings and infrastructure to natural disasters. GA has developed a range of tools to assist with exposure, damage capture and analysis. In this presentation, two open-source tools are discussed.

The Rapid Inventory Collection System (RICS), due to be released shortly as open-source, is a vehicular data collection system used to capture and save geo-tagged imagery of damaged structures. RICS permits 100% coverage of building damage in a disaster-affected area. This enables fieldwork to be undertaken more efficiently than a traditional foot survey. The system consists of Ethernet cameras, a GPS receiver and software written in C++. The software is multi-threaded and uses wxWidgets, wxThreads, Boost and SQLite. The software was developed by a single software engineer using an iterative development process. Each iteration included requirements gathering, design, coding, and field/system testing. RICS has proven to be very robust and has been used operationally following the 2009 Victorian Bushfires, the 2010 Kalgoorlie and Christchurch Earthquakes, 2011 Brisbane floods and Tropical Cyclone Yasi to collect geo-tagged imagery of structures and buildings.

The processing of RICS imagery, alongside other information sources such as satellite imagery, can be a significant task. Ideally, all information sources should be readily available to a user on a common user interface for analysis. To enable this, the Field Data Analysis Tool (FiDAT) is being developed. FiDAT will enable a user to view a wide range of data sources on a user interface to extract data on the nature and damage to an individual structure. The data can be updated, modified, and/or corrected to accurately reflect the severity of damage to a building. FiDAT is being developed in Python using an iterative development process. The beta version of this tool is due for completion in June 2012.

Nariman Habili is a software engineer and numerical modeller in the Risk and Impact Analysis Group, Geoscience Australia. He received the BSc and BEng (Hons) degrees from Flinders University in 1996 and 1997, respectively, and the PhD degree in electrical and electronic engineering (image processing) from the University of Adelaide in 2002. He has previously worked for General Dynamics Mediaware in Canberra and the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore on a range of image processing and computer vision projects.

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What's new in PHP 5.4Adam Harvey
3:30pm Wed Room 2, Manning Clark Center

PHP 5.4 isn’t quite as headline grabbing as PHP 5.3 was, but it includes a number of interesting features. It also includes a number of interesting feature removals and deprecations which will have long term implications on how PHP is written in the future.

In this talk, I’ll discuss both the new and old, and what developers should know to write modern code that will be supportable for the next few years.

Adam Harvey: Adam is a Web developer who’s been doing it long enough that he still has nightmares about tags and browsers with Motif toolkit UIs. When not suffering from post-Netscape-4-stress, he works to develop Web sites ranging in size from sites used by millions of users down to single user visualisations. He’s still not sure which is more fun.

Outside of things people pay him for, Adam is a developer on the PHP project working mainly in bug triage and documentation, along with being a general busybody on numerous mailing lists and IRC channels. He considers the slaying of magic quotes as possibly the greatest advance mankind has achieved since splitting the atom. (The fission splitting, not the Massive Attack song, although that isn’t bad either.)

Adam once spent three weeks travelling around the Mongolian steppes in a minivan. This has nothing to do with OSDC, but it is a good conversation starter.

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Wii Homebrew: Running and writing software for the Wii. Peter Serwylo
3:30pm Wed Room 3, Manning Clark Center

Many of you are probably aware that it is extremely easy to write software which makes use of the Wii controller. What you may not know is that it is also possible (though not quite as easy) to write software which executes on the Wii console.

Here we’ll start out with the fundamentals of installing the Homebrew Channel and accessing other peoples software in the Homebrew Browser (think App Store for homebrew projects).
We’ll look at some high quality examples of software people have ported to run on the Wii (there are less high quality originals). You definitely don’t need to be a developer to get this far.

Next we’ll cover coding, emulating, debugging and deploying your own software. This will include a short discussion of the different libraries which have been ported to the Wii, as well as many issues that I came across while developing a small sample game for this talk.

I’ll make sure that there are plenty of good references, so you can go home, mod your Wii (far easier than the old days of physical mod chips) and then start coding.

Peter Serwylo is currently entering the second year of his PhD at Monash University. In addition to this, he still works at Internet Vision Technologies as a web applications developer, where he has been employed since 2006. While Peter doesn’t claim to be an expert in homebrew development, he still finds it very interesting. Not only does it allow you to run your own software on various console devices, it is also a great challenge to develop within the constraints of the device.

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Negotiating Contracts Involving Open SourceBrendan Scott
4:00pm Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center

How do you include open source in your contracts or proposals? Who licenses the software? What happens if something goes wrong? Do your clients want you to be liable for the open source products you provide? Are there any third party services available to manage your, or your client’s risks?
In this talk we will discuss issues to be considered when including open source components as part of a product or service offering. In particular, we suggest ways in which open source might be dealt with in contractual documentation, issues relating to risk management and negotiation points for open source.

Brendan Scott: Brendan is the principal and founder of Open Source Law, a legal practice based in Sydney. Brendan has over 15 years of experience in dealing with IT and communications legal issues and is a founding member of Open Source Industry Australia Limited. He donated his time to represent OSIA at Standards Australia in respect of the OOXML ISO process and has drafted a number of submissions to various government inquiries on behalf of OSIA. Brendan gave advice to the SFLC on Australian law issues in the drafting of GPL v3. Brendan is a past president of the New South Wales Society for Computers and the Law and a past editor of its journal. Brendan is on the editorial board of the Internet Law Bulletin and is a member of the FSFE Freedom Task Force.

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Go: it's that simple?!Andrew Gerrand
4:00pm Wed Room 2, Manning Clark Center

Traditionally, language choice has been a matter of “Speed, reliability, and simplicity – pick two.”

Go is a unique language that bridges the gap between efficient statically typed languages (like C++ and Java) and productive dynamic language (like Python and JavaScript). But it’s not just the language that makes Go special – the Go standard libraries (the fruit of years of continued iteration) are a regular and consistent bedrock on which to build powerful, reusable software.

This talk gives a short introduction to Go, followed walk-throughs of some short programs that demonstrate the power of the standard library in real world situations.

Andrew Gerrand is a core developer on the Go Programming Language project. Besides authoring several Go tools and standard libraries, he has written dozens of articles and tutorials and given Go presentations at conferences around the world.

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Open Source Docs: The Good, The Bad, and the WTF?!Lana Brindley
4:00pm Wed Room 3, Manning Clark Center

Open source documentation is generally awful, often frightening, and sometimes it’s just outright weird. In this discussion, I will show you examples from the entire spectrum of open source documentation, in an effort to try and help you avoid some of the worst mistakes made by others before you. We will discuss why documentation is important for open source projects, and how to go about getting it written, and written well, without making too much of a fool out of yourself.

Lana Brindley has been playing with technology since that summer in the 80’s when she spent the whole time trying not to be eaten by a grue. She has been writing since she could hold a pencil, and is currently writing technical documentation for Red Hat. Lana holds business degrees in marketing and information systems, and with any luck will have a technical communicators degree by the end of the year. She is on a personal crusade to single-handedly improve open source documentation for the greater good.

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Freedom for Atoms!Jonathon Oxer
6:00pm Wed Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Free / Open Source is already a well entrenched concept in the world of software. We’re now quite accustomed to the idea of sharing bits and bytes for our mutual benefit, both for source code and for media such as Creative Commons content. But it’s not just bytes that want their freedom: atoms want to be free too! The FOSS mindset is now rising to prominence in parallel fields such as electronics and mechanical design in a way that can have scary consequences – how do you regulate firearms, for example, when you can print functional parts for an AR-15 assault rifle on a home-made 3D printer? And how do big electronics companies deal with the idea of hackers repurposing their proprietary designs as easily as we alter software?

Jonathon Oxer: Jonathan has been hacking on both hardware and software since he was a little tacker, and has a foot in both camps as founder of both a software company (Internet Vision Technologies) and a hardware manufacturer (Freetronics). He’s written a number of technology books including Ubuntu Hacks and Practical Arduino, been a Debian developer since 2003, and contributed to far too many FOSS projects for his own sanity.

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Keynote: Damian Conway
9:00am Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Fun with Dead Languages: Watch in mesmerized terror as Damian hacks code in three unrelated languages (none of them Perl). Along the way, you’ll also learn what’s wrong with modern CS education, why programmers shouldn’t frequent casinos, Thor’s Law, the language of moisture vaporators, C++ mysticism, state machines on steroids, programming without variables or subroutines, a cheap alternatives for distributed persistent computation, what the Romans used instead of braces, the ancient probabilistic wisdom of bodkins, and the price of fish.

Dr Damian Conway is a prominent member of the international Open Source community, a widely acclaimed technical speaker, writer, and educator, and the author of numerous well-known free and open source software modules (mainly for Perl and Vim).

He currently runs an international IT training company that provides speaker and programmer training from beginner to masterclass level throughout Europe, North America, and Australasia.

Much of his time over the past decade has been spent working with Larry Wall on the design and explication of the new Perl 6 programming language. Between 2001 and 2010 was also an Adjunct Associate Professor with the Faculty of Information Technology at Monash University.

Other technical areas on which he has spoken and published internationally include programming language design, programmer education, object orientation, software engineering, natural language generation, synthetic language generation, parsing technologies, quantum computation, linguistics, emergent systems, declarative programming, programmer workflow optimization, image morphing, human-computer interaction, geometric modelling, the psychophysics of perception, and nanoscale simulation.

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Break for Refreshments
10:00am Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Groovy Testing for Agile TeamsPaul King
10:30am Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Recent trends in software development have seen the introduction of new languages and frameworks; the adoption of new methodologies such as agile development; and an on-going evolution of underlying technologies to include non-relational databases, mobile platforms and cloud computing. A consequence of these changes is that traditional vendor based testing tools are in many cases no longer the best way to test today’s systems. This talk looks at the features that Groovy offers for testing systems. We’ll look at testing DSLs, data and model driven testing solutions, algorithmic and random test generation and various supporting tools. The talk is mostly focused on functional and acceptance level testing but we’ll also look at some developer testing goodies and tools in the Groovy ecosystem.

Paul King leads ASERT, an organization based in Brisbane, Australia which provides software development, training and mentoring services to customers wanting to embrace new technologies, harness best practices and innovate. He has been contributing to open source projects for nearly 20 years and is an active committer on numerous projects including Groovy. Paul speaks at international conferences, publishes in software magazines and journals, and is a co-author of Manning’s best-seller: Groovy in Action.

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Erlang in production: "I wish I'd known that when I started" Bernard Duggan
10:30am Thu Room 2, Manning Clark Center

We’ll examine, Drizzle, MySQL, MySQL Cluster (NDB), PostgreSQL, MongoDB, CouchDB, memcached, Cloud Storage, Cassandra and what POSIX (doesn’t) give us with file systems.

Bernard Duggan: For the last five years, Bernie has been a senior developer on M5 Networks’ core telephony softswitch, learning the black arts involved in making thousands of VoIP devices run off a single machine and maintaining a large, complex system with a tiny team of four geographically dispersed developers. After encountering Erlang at LCA in Sydney, he and his colleagues decided it was the way of the future (at least for their telephony software) and they have been gradually pushing more and more functionality out using it.

In past lives he has worked on Single Sign-On software, embedded software for bio-medical instruments and a few Playstation games of which he prays you’ve never heard.

Away from work, he likes to to hang out at his local hacker-space and mix carpentry, electronics and software into bizarre creations that should never see the light of day.

Bernie currently lives and works in Canberra and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.

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Australia's Toughest Linux DeploymentSridhar Dhanapalan
10:30am Thu Room 3, Manning Clark Center

A 300,000 seat Linux deployment is nothing to sneeze at. What if those seats were actually children’s laps? By providing a flexible learning platform, OLPC Australia aims to create a sustainable and comprehensive programme to enhance opportunities for every child in remote Australia. What’s more, we plan to achieve this by 2014.

In focusing on the most remote areas of the continent, the mission is by no means easy. These areas are typically not economically viable for a business to service, hence the need for a not-for-profit in the space. Expertise for hardware and software is virtually non-existent. Settlements are small and spread very far apart. Environmental conditions, cultures and lifestyles vary wildly. They are very different worlds from the coastal cities where the bureaucracies are based.

Even within communities, differences abound. Schools often stand in stark contrast to their surrounds. Government and business interests have also made their marks.

This talk will outline how OLPC Australia has developed a solution to suit Australian scenarios. Comparisons and contrasts will be made with other “computers in schools” programmes, OLPC deployments around the world and corporate IT projects.

For example, standard sysadmin practice typically mandates tight, centralised control over all systems and infrastructure. The OLPC Australia approach is the exact opposite. By promoting flexibility and ease of use, the programme can achieve sustainability by enabling management at the grass-roots level. The XO laptops themselves are built especially for education. They are extraordinarily rugged as well as being inexpensive. They are also totally repairable in the field, with minimal skill required. Training is conducted online, and an online community allows participants nationwide to share resources.

Key to the ongoing success of the programme is active engagement with all stakeholders, and a recognition of the total cost of ownership over a five-year life cycle.

Sridhar Dhanapalan is the Engineering Manager (CTO) at One Laptop per Child Australia. His primary duty is to ensure a reliable technology platform to facilitate learning and knowledge sharing in remote communities.

Amongst a variety of FLOSS contributions, Sridhar has previously been a board member of Linux Australia and President of the Sydney Linux Users Group (SLUG). He is currently very active in the One Laptop per Child community.

Sridhar has given presentations at various events including linux.conf.au, SLUG, Software Freedom Day and Document Freedom Day. Sridhar also has professional experience in running training workshops for groups of up to 50 people.

Sridhar maintains a blog, which is widely syndicated across FLOSS community blog aggregators.

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JBoss AS7Jason Shepherd
11:30am Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Jason Shepherd from Red Hat Support will introduce us to JBoss Application Server (AS) 7, the community edition of JBoss, which was released July 2011. AS7 is Java Enterprise Edition (JEE) 6, web profile certified, and AS 7.1 will be be fully JEE 6 compliant. JEE has some great features including: Context and Dependency Injection (CDI), Simplified EJB development, and packaging (3.1), Bean validation

Jason Shepherd is a middleware support engineer working for Red Hat in Brisbane. He has been working there for one year, and in that time has helped hundreds of customers with their Java enterprise middleware production, and development issues.

Prior to his time at Red Hat, Jason worked as a Java software developer, building web application heavily trafficked Flight Centre website. He is a Spring Certified Software Engineer, and Java 6 certified professional.

Jason likes to spend time in front of crowd, recently winning the Australian Salsa Classic, in Sydney.

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Perl Best PracticesJacinta Richardson
11:30am Thu Room 2, Manning Clark Center

As with many programming languages, it’s very easy to find Perl code that can best be described as “write only”. Cute tricks, short variable names, inconsistent spacing, dubious reliance on default arguments… Even without the added challenge of a whole extra embedded language (regular expressions), some Perl programs deserve to be referred to as line-noise.

Yet Perl is a beautiful, expressive language that can be used successfully by novices through to experts to achieve powerful results; and, with a little extra preparation can be easy to read, fun to work with, and a joy to maintain.

This talk will provide a lightning tour of the current status of Perl’s best practices.

Jacinta Richardson: When Jacinta isn’t teaching courses for her business, Perl Training Australia, she’s standing up in front of a conference or user group giving a presentation. Well, sometimes she helps organise conferences, responds to requests on mailing lists and very occasionally, sleeps.

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Real Brain HackingArjen Lentz
11:30am Thu Room 3, Manning Clark Center

The BlueHackers.org initiative will be three years at OSDC 2011 and many developers (and other community members) have found benefit from the lightning talks, website scribbles, or just seeing the friendly sticker on other people’s laptops.

Based on his own experience of walking around with wetware that sometimes malfunctions and (re)discovering solutions (non-patented!) created by smarter and more appropriately educated but less geekily tuned people than him, Arjen will guide attendees through an exploration of their own mind (non-intrusive and safe), then providing a viable starting point for self-patching of wetware – with appropriate references for further development.

The exercise is based on a friendly fork of the “learned helplessness” theory and implementation by Martin Seligman, one of the world’s leading experts on effective treatment of depression and related nasties.

OSDC and similar conferences are obviously an ideal place for this type of practical exercise.
No dangerous trickery or any form of therapy will be attempted.

Arjen Lentz: Arjen is founder and Exec.Director of Open Query which delivers remote database maintenance under a subscription model. He helped build MySQL AB (employee#25, 2001-2007) until just before its acquisition by Sun Microsystems. He also co-authored the 2nd edition of O’Reilly’s High Performance MySQL book, and speaks regularly at user groups and conferences.

Originally Arjen is a C programmer, with coding experience going back to the early 80s. He also has a keen interest in Open Source and sustainable business models (Upstarta.biz), and started the BlueHackers.org initiative.

Outside work hours, Arjen likes to spend time with his daughter, cook, walk, camp, read, listen to music, and grow herbs/veggies.

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Break for Lunch
12:30pm Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Unifying the Software Development Lifecycle Using Open Source and Domain Specific LanguagesPaul Marrington
1:30pm Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Open source technologies are now up to the challenge of unifying the software development lifecycle. In this talk I will demonstate how interactive documentation and domain specific languages allow the use of open source systems to support all teams in a project – from client to support. I will be introducing usdlc.net – an open source interactive documentation system that supports this concept for small to medium teams.

First half is about how an interactive documentation can help all groups involved in a software development project. The second half is a hands-on demonstration of designing and implementing a real-world sub-system using this approach. It uses the open source uSDLC framework with Java and Groovy on the jvm. This is the debut for uSDLC. uSDLC.net will be live for the conference. usdlc/usdlc is available on github now.

Paul Marrington is a software designer with over 30 years experience in diverse fields including mining, manufacturing, defence, tolling and government. Peter has taken “time off” to work as a software architect and software manager implementing agile practices in hostile environments. His frustration with the lack of cohesiveness in the development lifecycle has led to a passion for improvement in this area.

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Python for R&DEdward Schofield
1:30pm Thu Room 2, Manning Clark Center

This talk demonstrates with practical examples why Python is a superb language for research and development in technical disciplines.

Dr Edward Schofield is a well-known contributor in the NumPy and SciPy communities. He was the release manager for five releases of SciPy in 2005-6 and the author of the maximum entropy and parts of the sparse matrix module. He has 20 years of experience in programming, teaching, and public speaking, including 10 years of experience with Python. Ed holds a PhD in computer science from Imperial College London and an MA in maths and statistics from Cambridge University. He is a director of Python Charmers, a company that provides specialist Python training to scientists and engineers in the Asia-Pacific region. He also consults to the Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

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Getting started with Selenium 2Sebastiano Armeli Battana
1:30pm Thu Room 3, Manning Clark Center

Selenium is a well-known web application testing framework used for functional testing. The new version, Selenium 2, merges the best features from Selenium and the clean API from WebDriver. In this session we will see how easy testing your web application can be with an open source such as Selenium 2. The presentation aims to make the developers familiar with this functional testing tool. An example of a Maven Java project using Selenium 2 to test a web page will be shown. Spring Framework and TestNG will be used in the presented project.

Sebastiano Armeli Battana is software engineer focused on JavaScript and Java development and he is really passionate about web technologies. He works as consultant in SMS Management & Technology adopting Java technologies and he also works as web freelancer. He is the author of a jQuery plugin called JAIL and he maintains his personal site at http://www.sebastianoarmelibattana.com.

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Continuous Delivery Using JenkinsCliffano Subagio
2:30pm Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center

The adoption of Continuous Delivery as the next step after Continuous Integration has been taking off in the recent year, with the goal of achieving production quality application early in the development cycle through automation and collaboration improvements. This talk discusses how Jenkins (nee Hudson) is used to implement Continuous Delivery in a software development project, and highlights the benefits achieved from its practices.

Cliffano Subagio likes to automate anything, he has been a Jenkins contributor since 2008. Cliffano works as a Senior Developer at Sensis, he has set up and maintain Continuous Delivery systems for a number of projects.

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Structured Data Representation for Ruby, Groovy and ScalaKazuaki Maeda
2:30pm Thu Room 2, Manning Clark Center

This presentation shows RugsOn, a simple representation for structured data written in a text-based format, and the RugsOn way to program using Ruby, Groovy and Scala.
RugsOn was newly designed for structured data representation using Ruby, Groovy and Scala. One representation in RugsOn is compatible with the three programming languages. Moreover, RugsOn related tools are now developing to support Aspect-oriented programming (called AOP) and they will be distributed as an open source software in a few months. In this presentation, I will open my experiences and discuss what kind of applications we can develop using RugsOn.
The design principle of RugsOn is simplicity of structured data representation. XML is currently used as a standard language for the representation in wide application area. XML documents are written in human readable text format, but they are composed of many redundant tags, so that there are some cases where it is difficult to read and understand them. One of the approaches to overcome the situation is JSON. JSON is a portable data representation and it is an internal DSL in JavaScript. However, it is an external DSL in Java and other programming languages. RugsOn is an internal DSL in Ruby, Groovy and Scala.
A program generator is provided to create programs from schema definitions for RugsOn. In the author’s experience, productivity was improved in the design and implementation of programs that manipulate structured data.

Kazuaki Maeda graduated from the Department of Administration Engineering and the Graduate School of Science and Technology at Keio University in Japan. After leaving Keio University, he got an academic position at Chubu University in Japan and is now a professor in the Department of Business Administration and Information Science. His research interests are Compiler Construction, Domain Specific Languages, Object-Oriented Programming, Software Engineering and Open Source Software.

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The Art of Writing Small ProgramsOlly Betts
2:30pm Thu Room 3, Manning Clark Center

My first computer had 1KB of RAM, and when I finally got it upgraded to 4KB the possibilities seemed endless! At university, I coauthored what is probably the world’s smallest tetris program – one line of BBC BASIC, 256 bytes in all. These days I have a laptop which has six million times more RAM than that first computer, and my work involves billions of times more data than it could process. Yet I believe some of the lessons learned from those resource-constrained days are still useful – come along and let’s see if I can convince anybody else of this.

Olly Betts makes a living as a freelance free software developer and consultant, working mostly on search-related projects using Xapian.

He is originally from the UK, but now lives near Wellington, New Zealand.

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Break for Refreshments
3:00pm Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Discussion Panel
3:30pm Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Lightning Talks
4:00pm Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Drinks
6:00pm Thu Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Keynote: Brian Catto
9:00am Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Open Source Software and the Australian Government: Brian will discuss the Open Source strategy of the Australian Government and the impact it is having. He will present the opportunities that open source can deliver and outline the steps that the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO) is taking to ensure that the government benefits from these opportunities.

Brian Catto is Director, Architecture and Emerging Technologies, at the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO), a Business Group of the Department of Finance and Deregulation.

Brian has been involved in the IT sector of the Australian Public Service since 1989, when he commenced as a programmer with the Department of Social Security. Over the next 19 years he moved through many areas of IT, including (but not limited to) roles in architecture, knowledge management, business process reengineering and security.

In 2008, Brian took up the role of the inaugural Chief Information Officer for the Murray-Darling Basin Authority, and commenced an ambitious modernisation program for the organisation’s ICT environment. As CIO, he had oversight of infrastructure, desktop applications, web development, records management (physical and electronic) and IT security.

Brian joined AGIMO in August 2011 and is currently responsible for the team that manages the Government’s open source policy, cloud computing policy, Australian Government Architecture framework and the IPv6 transition strategy.

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Break for Refreshments
10:00am Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Building 3D Apps with JavascriptGraham Weldon
10:30am Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Are you a web developer that wants to build interesting and awesome 3D applications and games? Learning OpenGL, DirectX, XNA, or any of the other C/C#/Compiled language libraries can be a bit daunting.

With the massive leap forward in Javascript engine capabilities and browser speeds, implementing three dimensional graphics and applications with Javascript has become a real viable possibility. There has been an explosion of resources in and around 3D for Javascript, and the possibilities are opening up to web developers with existing Javascript knowledge to build exciting new apps on this technology.

I’ll introduce a couple of 3D libraries that make development in Javascript easy for immersive 3D applications, and run through a demonstration to create a basic application in 3D that users can take the source code for and extend.

Graham Weldon: Graham is a core developer for CakePHP, and developer advocate for the framework. Contributing to CakePHP for 3 years, and developing applications on PHP for over 10 years. Graham is a world recognised public speaker in the PHP and Open Source Software communities.

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Groovy and Concurrency with GParsPaul King
10:30am Fri Room 2, Manning Clark Center

This talk looks at using Groovy for writing multi-threaded, concurrent and parallel programs. We’ll briefly look at leveraging legacy Java techniques such as multiple processes, multiple threads, the java.util.concurrent APIs and shared-state atomicity.

We’ll then look as some useful AST transforms in core Groovy (Lazy, Synchronized, Immutable, WithReadLock and WithWriteLock) before divign headlong into GPars. GPars is a comprehensive library for parallel execution that provides a menu of options to the developer.

The different choices available have pros and cons depending on the circumstances. We’ll look at the parallel collection support and the optional transparent way to use that support. Then we’ll examine Map/Reduce. We’ll also look at the DataFlow approach to achieving concurrency, the Actors approach, the use of composable asynchronous functions and the use of Agents and Active Objects.

Finally, we’ll peek at Multiverse (Software Transactional Memory) and JCSP, two emerging approaches that might appear more prominently in future versions of GPars. Then we’ll wrap up with a brief look at testing multi-threaded programs.

Paul King leads ASERT, an organization based in Brisbane, Australia which provides software development, training and mentoring services to customers wanting to embrace new technologies, harness best practices and innovate. He has been contributing to open source projects for nearly 20 years and is an active committer on numerous projects including Groovy. Paul speaks at international conferences, publishes in software magazines and journals, and is a co-author of Manning’s best-seller: Groovy in Action.

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Dropping ACID: Eating Data in a Web 2.0 Cloud World.Stewart Smith
10:30am Fri Room 3, Manning Clark Center

Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. This is part survey, part critique of the various Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durability models available from various modern databases and data stores used in modern Web and Cloud environments. We’ll not just look at the single machine solution but how these systems work in a distributed environment. We’ll cover what happens when N of your M machines running $software goes away. Is your data still there? Do you care?

Stewart Smith joined Percona in 2011 as Director of Server Development with a deep background in database internals including MySQL, MySQL Cluster, Drizzle, InnoDB and HailDB.

Prior to joining Percona, Stewart worked at Rackspace on the Drizzle database server focusing on getting it through a critical milestone of a stable Generally Available (GA) release. Prior to Rackspace, he worked on Drizzle in the CTO Labs group inside Sun Microsystems.

As one of the founding core developers of Drizzle, Stewart has deep expertise in the code base. He had direct involvement in significant refactoring of the database server including removing the FRM, the InnoDB storage engine, xtrabackup, the storage engine API, CATALOG support and countless bug fixes. He also maintains HailDB, a shared library offering a NoSQL C API directly to InnoDB.

At Sun Microsystems, and MySQL before that, Stewart was a Senior Software Engineer in the MySQL Cluster team working on core code and features inside the MySQL Server and the Cluster codebase working on projects such as: geographical asynchronous replication, online add node, online backup, NDBINFO for improved monitoring and the Win32 port.

He’s been found speaking at MySQL User Conferences, linux.conf.au, OSCON, OSDC, SAGE-AU and more.

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The Return of JavaScript: 3 Open-Source Projects that are driving JavaScript's renaissanceBen Teese
11:30am Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Web development is experiencing a major change at the moment. Users are demanding increasingly responsive and interactive web applications. The mobile web has taken off. And closed platforms like Flash are yielding to open standards like HTML 5.

In this presentation I’ll argue that the language that will underpin this revolution is JavaScript – despite it’s poor reputation. Furthermore, I’ll explain how JavaScript’s resurrection is being driven by a slew of new open-source technologies, of which I’ll focus on three:

1. Backbone.js: Client-side JavaScript development has until recently resembled the wild-west from a software design perspective. I’ll explain how the Backbone.js framework aims to introduce order via a lightweight MVC-style approach.
2. Node.js: Event-based JavaScript on the server-side? Node.js has been the subject of much interest lately. I’ll cover the fundamentals of what Node.js is – and what it isn’t. I’ll also talk about important elements of the ecosystem that is growing around it.
3. CoffeeScript: Let’s face it, JavaScript is a language only a mother could love – especially if you’re coming from Ruby or Python. I’ll give a quick overview of how the CoffeeScript language smooths those ragged edges and improves the developer experience.

Attendees will leave this presentation with an up-to-date picture of the state of the JavaScript open-source world, and an understanding of why JavaScript is more important than ever.

Ben Teese: Ben is a senior consultant at Shine Technologies, a software development and consulting company with offices in Melbourne and Brisbane. With over 12 years experience in software development, Ben has spoken at numerous Java and Rails user group meetings. Ben has also started to work with the new generation of JavaScript frameworks for the web. His writings can be found at http://blog.shinetech.com/author/benteeseshinetech/

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Lifting Scala's functional and object styles to concurrent programmingStewart Mackenzie
11:30am Fri Room 2, Manning Clark Center

Ozma is a conservative extension to the Scala programming language with Oz concurrency. Ozma adds dataflow values, light-weight threads, lazy execution and ports to Scala. Ozma is a redesigned, reimplemented language, with a new compiler and runtime environment. The language has preserved Scala semantics as much as possible, nearly all. In order to achieve this, decisions were made that limit the expressiveness of Ozma, compared to Oz. In particular, full unification is dropped, in favor of shallow unification (variable-variable).
This talk describes the language, with a tutorial, examples and precise semantics, as well as the implementation of the compiler and the runtime environment.

Stewart Mackenzie: taoist, vegetarian, software and martial artist, loves travel and hacking on mozart oz.

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An introduction to Open Source Geospatial Information Systems (GIS)Gavin Jackson
11:30am Fri Room 3, Manning Clark Center

Open Source software has come a long way in recent years for storing, manipulating and presenting spatial data. The Openstreetmap (www.openstreetmap.org) project is a great example of what can be achieved using open software and open data.

This presentation will look at using a combination of postgis, geoserver and openlayers to process, store and present vector and raster map data.

The presentation will also demonstrate OGC web mapping protocols, map projections, spatial toolkits (including uDig, gdal and ogr) and sources of free geospatial data.

Gavin Jackson is a software engineer working in the Spatial Team on the Atlas of Living Australia project (www.ala.org.au).

Bio: A software engineer with 10 years experience (BInfTech ANU, Msc UNSW), he has worked in a variety of environments, including Department of Defence (IT Security), CPT Global (Stress and Volume Testing), Les Mills (Software Engineer) and, currently, CSIRO (Spatial Software Engineer).

He has long been an advocate for the use and implementation of Open Source technologies, and is a Redhat Certified Engineer (RHCE).

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Break for Lunch
12:30pm Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Joys and Pains of Node.js in the EnterpriseMarc Fasel
1:30pm Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Node.js is a new open-source framework for building highly concurrent server applications in JavaScript. Despite only being version 0.5 it is getting much attention. The reason for that is it uses a concurrency model that shows great promise in scalability: event-driven asynchronous Input/Output.
Shine technologies is currently involved in three enterprise Node.js projects, one of which I am a senior developer in. My talk will be about the experiences of using Node.js for enterprise projects.
I will explain what Node.js is, what asynchronous Input/ Ouput is, and an application in Node.js looks like. The bulk of my talk will be about the joys and pains using Node.js.
The attendees will get an inside look on Node.js enterprise development, and will know when to choose Node.js for a project.

Marc Fasel: Marc is a senior consultant at Shine Technologies, a software development and consulting company with offices in Melbourne and Brisbane. He has 18 years experience building software with a multitude of languages including Java and JavaScript. Marc has extensive experience building large-scale enterprise applications, and has documented has experiences with Node.js on http://blog.shinetech.com/2011/06/10/nodejs-from-the-enterprise-java-perspective/ and http://shinetech.com/thoughts/thought-articles/139-asynchronous-code-design-with-nodejs-.

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Groovy Baby!Craig Aspinall
1:30pm Fri Room 2, Manning Clark Center

Over the last 18 months, Groovy has gone from being something I used occasionally as a convenience to being my go to programming language. In this session I would like to show some of the things in the Groovy language and basic libraries that caused this transition. We’ll look at how simple applications of meta-programming made code cleaner, how Groovy SQL fills the middle ground between JDBC and ORM, and how GroovyWS makes consuming web services super simple!

Craig Aspinall: Craig has been hooked on computers since he started playing Galaxian on the Sharp MZ-80 his dad built at home some 30 years ago. From those humble beginnings Craig has forged a successful software development career over the last decade and half, working in industries as diverse as telecoms, digital CCTV and finance, and in roles ranging from a graduate software engineer to software development manager.

Now Craig has returned to doing what he enjoys most, creating and using software to satisfy real business needs, as a Software Quality Engineer with Suncorp, specializing in project automation and “building quality in”.

He also helps organize (and regularly presents at) the Queensland JVM user group and co-hosts the Coding By Numbers podcast.

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Cross-Distribution Packaging Made EasyTim Serong
1:30pm Fri Room 3, Manning Clark Center

One of the challenges for Linux software developers is the need to build packages that run on a variety of distros. Usually this means you need to be running several versions of each distro you want to support, and build binary packages for each one. Frankly, this sucks.

Happily, there is an easier way with the Open Build Service. OBS provides the infrastructure to create packages for openSUSE, SLES, Fedora, RHEL, CentOS, Mandriva, Debian and Ubuntu, all via a convenient web interface. Rather than using “compiler farms” of different hardware, OBS creates a clean VM instance for each build, saving time and resources. Collaboration tools are provided, supporting different user access rights, merge requests and review functionality.

This presentation explores the various features of OBS, and will show you how your life (well, the software packaging part of your life) can be made much easier.

Tim Serong: Tim is currently employed by SUSE as Senior Clustering Engineer, working on the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension. If HA clustering has taught him anything, it is that you can never ever have too many log files. Interests include motorcycling, beer, and making technology simpler and more reliable (although not necessarily in that order, and usually not all at the same time).

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Drizzle 7, GA and Supported: Current & Future Features Stewart Smith
2:30pm Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Stewart explains the architecture that has evolved to culminate in the Drizzle 7 GA release. He discusses the future architectural direction of the Drizzle database and how this will enable Drizzle to be used as an application infrastructure component, not just a database server.

Stewart Smith joined Percona in 2011 as Director of Server Development with a deep background in database internals including MySQL, MySQL Cluster, Drizzle, InnoDB and HailDB.

Prior to joining Percona, Stewart worked at Rackspace on the Drizzle database server focusing on getting it through a critical milestone of a stable Generally Available (GA) release. Prior to Rackspace, he worked on Drizzle in the CTO Labs group inside Sun Microsystems.

As one of the founding core developers of Drizzle, Stewart has deep expertise in the code base. He had direct involvement in significant refactoring of the database server including removing the FRM, the InnoDB storage engine, xtrabackup, the storage engine API, CATALOG support and countless bug fixes. He also maintains HailDB, a shared library offering a NoSQL C API directly to InnoDB.

At Sun Microsystems, and MySQL before that, Stewart was a Senior Software Engineer in the MySQL Cluster team working on core code and features inside the MySQL Server and the Cluster codebase working on projects such as: geographical asynchronous replication, online add node, online backup, NDBINFO for improved monitoring and the Win32 port.

He’s been found speaking at MySQL User Conferences, linux.conf.au, OSCON, OSDC, SAGE-AU and more.

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Coping with errors - we are doing it wrongMichael Neale
2:30pm Fri Room 2, Manning Clark Center

In 2011 we now have software that mostly runs very fast – but it is still not as reliable as both technologists and “ordinary” users expect. Most programming languages and runtimes provide ways to deal with expected and unexpected error conditions – and yet software is still notoriously unreliable. It is still far to common to restart/reboot/try again. In this talk I would like to cover the often mis-stated benefits of the Erlang programming languages approach to dealing with errors in non-stop systems, how it works, and how it can apply to other programming languages and runtimes to build more reliable software (which happens to be more multi processor friendly – but that is just a nice side benefit).

Michael Neale: Michael is a polyglot developer who is sometimes tricked into working out how to automate large numbers of unreliable things, reliably. github.com/michaelneale shows his short attention span on a variety of open source projects, spanning many languages. Currently he is one of the technical cofounders of Cloudbees.com, and previously worked for Red Hat on the Drools and cloud projects.

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Predicting the Flow of Tsunamis and Floods using the FOSS environment ANUGAStephen Roberts
2:30pm Fri Room 3, Manning Clark Center

Modelling the effects on the built environment of natural hazards, such as flooding, storm surges and tsunami, is critical for understanding the economic and social impact of these hazards on our urban communities.
As part of this process, Australian National University (ANU) and Geoscience Australia (GA) have collaboratively developed an open source software program called ANUGA, to model water flow and in particular inundation events. Using this software we can help draft evacuation plans, design protective levees and design cities safely – reducing casualties and damage to property in communities affected by such disasters.
In this talk I will give an overview of ANUGA, its use of python and other open source libraries and resources to provide a sophisticated modelling environment that can be easily expanded by advanced and naive users alike.

Stephen Roberts: Associate Professor Stephen Roberts is currently Head of the Department of Mathematics at the Australian National University. Stephen works on finding efficient and robust methods for the solution of fluid flow problems associated with dam breaks, tsunamis, storm surge and flooding. In collaboration with members of the Risk Assessment group at Geosciences Australia, his work has been incorporated into an open source tsunami and flood modeling computer program called ANUGA.
Used by local, state and commonwealth government to model risk from tsunamis and flooding, this work was presented on the ABC The New Inventors program.

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Break for Refreshments
3:00pm Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Lightning Talks
3:30pm Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center
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Keynote: Tony Beal
4:30pm Fri Room 1, Manning Clark Center

Legal Trips, Traps and Solutions for Open Source Software Developers: This session looks at common legal liability dangers for open source software projects. Areas covered will include the growing threat from software patents, legal aspects of structuring and managing the development effort, licensing issues and contribution agreements. The presentation will provide you with practical no cost or low cost steps you can take to avoid legal problems and position your development project for success.

Tony Beal: Tony has been a strategic adviser to many of Australia’s leading commercial and government business enterprises in respect to the legal and commercial frameworks for major strategic ICT initiatives. He has a keen interest in open source software and has played a key role in promoting the uptake and development of open source software solutions within the Australian Government by ensuring Departments and Agencies understand the open source legal environment and how to position projects for success. Tony is the President of the ACT Society for Technology and the Law Inc., a past President of the Victorian Society for Computers Inc. and the Law and a life member of Electronic Frontiers Australia.

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